Emergency Management

Contact

Emergencies Call 911

Local Backup Numbers:
523-4850
523-9177
707-9349

Before an Emergency…

Plan Ahead! Listen for Information! Have Ready:
Transportation, Shelter, Warmth, Food, Water, Medication
A plan for dealing with any special medical needs

Click here for a special checklist to help you plan! 
Visit ReadyNH.COM to learn about more great emergency preparedness resources from the State of NH.

Under New Hampshire law, each community is required to have an Emergency Management Director who is responsible for coordination of a response to an emergency through a state-wide Incident Command System. In Canaan, the Emergency Management program is also responsible for the management of any emergency within the Town. The Director is responsible for planning to prevent disasters and pre-planning for resources in the event of a disaster. Canaan has used its Emergency Management Program to prepare plans for a wide variety of disasters including fires, floods, ice storms, droughts, health epidemics, spills and explosions.

Activities may include planning for and delivering medical care, sheltering, food, water, transportation, evacuation, reopening roads, removing power lines, flood management, drainage improvements, rescue and education.

For regional events, all activities are coordinated on a state-wide basis.

Click on the above image to see the full slideshow!

The following individuals make up the command structure for Emergency Management in Canaan:

  • Emergency Management Director – Chief Bill Bellion
  • Assistant Emergency Management Director – Chief Sam Frank
  • Alternate Director – Sergeant Todd Baravalle
  • Other members of Town Government, including firemen, highway employees, FAST Squad, Water and Sewer and Administration, participate.
Rain Event: July 2017

On July 1, 2017 heavy rains hit the Northeast causing flooding and erosion in many Upper Valley and North Central NH Communities. Canaan sustained damage to 12 roads. Cost of repairs was $75, 000.

Hurricane Irene: July 2011

More than 5 inches of rain feel in under 10 hours on Sunday, August 28th as Irene swamped the Northeast. Most of our streams flooded over their banks and washed out road shoulders, roadways and culverts. Innumerable roads were closed in Canaan with a few remaining closed for up to two weeks.

More than 40 people, including Firefighters, Police Officers, Highway crew and civilian volunteers, served as traffic control, filled and placed sand bags, pumped cellars, set up generators, saved a dam, rescued propane tanks, removed debris, set up barricades, rescued stranded people, towed flooded vehicles, manned shelters, responded to downed power lines and notified people of impeding danger. Their efforts were astounding. Less than twenty hours of paid employee overtime was recorded.

Preparations were completed more than 48 hours prior to the storm and we all survived fairly well. There was significant damage to town highways that has been mostly repaired with 75% of the cost borne by FEMA.

Tornado: August 2011
Noreaster 2007

April 15, 2007

Floods
July 2019 Flood

On July 11, 2019, a torrential rain storm hit Canaan at 8:15 PM. More than 6 inches of rain came down in less than 2 hours. Streams overflowed, flat roads had many inches of standing water and roadside ditches washed out taking more than half of the driving lanes of the dirt roads downstream.

A total of 29 town roads were damaged. A total of 13 miles of the 35 miles of road experienced severe damage. Several roads were impassable. In addition, there was damage to several town facilities including the transfer station Road bridge.

In all there was about $400,000 in damages to roads and facilities. The Town is expected to take at least two months to complete repairs. Canaan is waiting on a storm declaration so that we can be reimbursed by FEMA for part of the cost.

October 30, 2017

Significant damage occurred as a result of the October 30, 2017 flood. The damage affected roads…

March 17, 2011
“Mother’s Day Flood” May 14, 2006
“The Great Flood” March 1, 1896
historic photo of men in boat in floodwaters downtown